A fine collection

Aircraft Bikes Cars


Aircraft Bikes Cars – A beautiful collection of prints by David Townsend Landscape photographer.

Aircraft Bikes Cars
I was lucky enough to capture these at a local airshow held at the ex military base, RAF Manston in Kent, England where some of the iconic RAF fighter planes of the Second World War were based.

Plans like Supermarine Spitfire Mk XVI and the Hawker Hurricane IIC, housed under one museum roof at the historic Battle of Britain airfield in Manston, Kent.

The Tornado GR4
A two-seat, all-weather, day/night attack and reconnaissance aircraft. It has been in service with the RAF for more than 30 years, but a combination of major upgrade programmes and numerous continual enhancements has kept the aircraft amongst the forefront of all attack aircraft.

Still one of the very few aircraft in the world that is able to operate at low level, day or night and in poor weather, the Tornado is now equipped with a modern precision-guided weapons suite and world-class reconnaissance sensors such as the Reconnaissance Airborne Pod for Tornado (RAPTOR). The aircraft also carries the Litening III Advanced Targeting Pod, which is used in both attack and reconnaissance roles.

The Hawker Sea Fury
Carrier borne fighter-bomber was the British Fleet Air Arm’s last piston-engined fighter, developed during WWII it did not see service with the Fleet Air Arm until after the war. It was arguably the fastest piston powered aircraft ever manufactured.

It was a development from the Hawker Tempest, itself a development of the Hawker Typhoon. Originally, the Hawker Fury was designed by Sidney Camm in 1942 under F.2/43 specification, to provide the RAF with a lightweight replacement for the Tempest II.

The design was modified in 1943 to meet a Royal Navy specification (N.7/43) for a carrier-based interceptor and named the Hawker Sea Fury. Hawker was designated to work on the land-based version, and responsibility for the naval conversion was assigned to Boulton-Paul Aircraft Ltd. of Wolverhampton.

AgustaWestland Apache
A licence-built version of the AH-64D Apache Longbow attack helicopter for the British Army’s Army Air Corps. The first eight helicopters were built by Boeing; the remaining 59 were assembled by Westland Helicopters (now part of Leonardo) at Yeovil, Somerset in England from Boeing-supplied kits. Changes from the AH-64D include Rolls-Royce Turbomeca engines, a new electronic defensive aids suite and a folding blade mechanism allowing the British version to operate from ships. The helicopter was initially designated WAH-64 by Westland Helicopters and was later designated Apache AH Mk 1 (often shortened to Apache AH1) by the Ministry of Defence.

The Triumph Rocket III
A three-cylinder motorcycle made by Triumph Motorcycles Ltd. At 2,294 cc (140.0 cu in) it had the largest-displacement engine of any mass-production motorcycle, as of September 2004.

The name “Rocket III” is derived from the 1968 BSA motorcycle, the Rocket 3, which was also produced as the “Triumph Trident.”

The Rocket III Project started in 1998 led by Triumph Product Range Manager Ross Clifford and started with a lot of research – especially in the US, where big cruisers were selling well. The main competitors were the Harley-Davidson Ultraglide and the Honda Goldwing so the initial idea was to develop a 1,600 cc performance cruiser.

In 2003, the prototype was renamed the ‘Rocket’, following market research, continuing the heritage of the BSA Rocket 3/Triumph Trident motorcycles.

Ford Capri Mk I (1969–1974)
Production of the Capri began on 14 December 1968 in Ford’s Dagenham plant in the UK and on 16 December 1968 at the Cologne plant in West Germany,[5] it was unveiled in January 1969 at the Brussels Motor Show, with sales starting the following month. The intention was to reproduce in Europe the success Ford had had with the North American Ford Mustang; to produce a European pony car.

MARCH 1969 The 2000GT introduced for the UK market, fitted with the V4 engine.

Cobra
For over 30 years Cobra Seats has been manufacturing exclusively in the United Kingdom, earning a reputation that unites innovative technology, quality of design and functional elegance.

It’s a reputation built on passion. In the 1960’s Len Dunsford was acknowledged as one of the country’s best vehicle trimmers – his work graced racing cockpits used by names like Moss, McQueen and Clark.

Photography is a love affair with life


There is only you and your camera. The limitations is your photography are in yourself, for what we see is what we are.
Ernst Haas 1921 – 1986

David Townsend Photography